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Poll Question for June 21 Issue

Reader Pollgreen

Poll results will be published in the June 21, 2017 issue, page 4.

Comments (2)

  • Frances Webb

    I think it has been proven that marijuana can be a great help to people suffering the effects of chemo, glaucoma, and several other illnesses. I don’t think they should be deprived of this relief.

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    • Karen Morgan

      . JPs PLEASE don’t believe everything you are told. I want to challenge the quote made by Mr Wine to the JPs that no one has died from Marijuana overdose. Perhaps there is no documented evidence of death directly from marijuana but there are many hazards from the use of marijuana, and specifically “medical marijuana”. “Marijuana is the illicit drug most frequently found in the blood of drivers who have been involved in vehicle crashes, including fatal ones” from the government website National Institute of Drug abuse (NIH) Consider these examples of tragedies involving children and “medical marijuana” : June 2017 A Rhode Island toddler nearly died from overdosing on “medical” marijuana edibles according to authorities. The child reportedly ingested “medical” marijuana edibles that belonged to her grandfather. May, 2017: Two children in Utah were hospitalized after mistakenly eating a cookie laced with marijuana. May, 2017: A ten-year-old in New York was reportedly hospitalized after mistakenly eating candy infused with marijuana. The candy appeared to have been sold to the boy’s father as “medical marijuana.” According to news sources, the piece the boy ate contained 250mg of THC–approximately 25 times a normal “serving” of marijuana. Many more examples are on the Family Council website. More information is definitely needed before decisions are made that will affect all of us. The NIH site also has this: “ Development of drugs from botanicals such as the marijuana plant poses numerous challenges. Botanicals may contain hundreds of unknown, active chemicals, and it can be difficult to develop a product with accurate and consistent doses of these chemicals. Use of marijuana as medicine also poses other problems such as the adverse health effects of smoking and THC-induced cognitive impairment. Nevertheless, a growing number of states have legalized dispensing of marijuana or its extracts to people with a range of medical conditions. An additional concern with “medical marijuana” is that little is known about the long-term impact of its use by people with health- and/or age-related vulnerabilities—such as older adults or people with cancer, AIDS, cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, or other neurodegenerative diseases. Further research will be needed to determine whether people whose health has been compromised by disease or its treatment (e.g., chemotherapy) are at greater risk for adverse health outcomes from marijuana use.”

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