School Millage Defeated

Posted

Mountain View School District’s request for a 7-mill property tax increase was defeated in last week’s countywide vote, 927-826.

Of the more than 8,000 registered voters in Stone County, 1,753 participated.

Unofficial vote results were announced after polls closed May 18, with early and absentee votes generated immediately. Votes on election night were tallied as the eight precincts across the county submitted results. A voting breakdown was later provided by school district zone, reflecting how people voted in relation to their residence (voters can now vote at any precinct on election day).

The election commission planned to meet Tuesday to certify results.

Zones encompassing the schools at Rural Special (1) and Timbo (2) were the only two to carry in favor of the millage increase. Zone 1 in southwest Stone County voted 184 For and 64 Against. Zone 2 in western Stone County voted 139 For and 90 Against.

Other zones voted Against by margins ranging from 54 percent to 72 percent.

Zone 3, which extends from just west of Mountain View southeastward, voted 180-152 Against.

Zone 4 just east of Mountain View voted 129-89 Against.

Zone 5 in Mountain View voted 111-90 Against.

Zone 6 north of Mountain View voted 202-115 Against.

Zone 7 in eastern Stone County voted 151-57 Against.

Two candidates were elected without opposition: Lisa Rachelle Stewart in Zone 1 and Micheal “Tiger” Stewart in Zone 4.

Unofficial vote for/against results by precinct were as follows: Arbanna 13/37, Dodd Mountain 52/67, Fairgrounds 138/188, Fifty Six 14/32, Foothills 40/82, Fox 135/34, Pleasant Grove 15/81, Timbo 89/67.

A chart showing a break-down of the vote tally in each zone was published with this story.

Brent Howard, superintendent of the Mountain View School District, said he is disappointed in the outcome and will consult with the school board to see what its members want to do.

“I still think that it has a chance. I’m not gonna rule out that we might approach this again,” he commented.

While the school district is not in immediate financial danger, “It’s gonna get there,” he warned, noting that the district is in year 17 of operating three campus locations. “It’s getting tougher all the time.”

He said the biggest misconception concerning the millage request is that it was primarily for one or both of the rural campuses. “This is something we all need. It’s for everybody,” he commented.

“If we don’t do something, and be proactive, it will get to the point that we can’t make our own decisions,” he said. “Nobody wants that.”

For right now, “our main plan is just to have school next year at all three locations,” Howard said. “It is what it is and we’re gonna do the best we can.”

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here